How to crochet crossed stitches

It’s possible to create new textures in crochet just by combining simple stitches with imagination. This is the case for this crossed texture stitch that is made using chains and crossed double crochet. This combination is known as crossed trebles.

 

 

Let’s see how it’s done.

 

Make a foundation chain of 4 chains + 2

The crossed stitch is worked after the 6th chain from the hook. So, when you finish a row you will have to chain 5 before turning your work.

To crochet the crossed treble stitch, wrap the yarn around the hook twice. Insert the hook into the designated stitch and wrap the yarn around the hook. Pull the yarn through the chain stitch to now have 4 loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around the hook and draw it through the first 2 loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around the hook, skip the next 2 stitches and insert the hook into the third stitch. Wrap the yarn around the hook and pull the yarn through the stitch, you will now have 5 loops on your hook. * Wrap the yarn around the hook and pull it through the first 2 loops on the hook*. Repeat from * to * 3 more times. Chain 2, wrap the yarn around the hook and insert it into the center of the motif, wrap the yarn around the hook and pull the yarn through with the 3 loops. Repeat from * to * 2 more times.

 

 

We made this video to go along with the instructions, so you can see that it’s easier than it sounds.

 

Row 1: crochet the whole row in crossed treble stitch until there is 1 stitch left, work 1 treble crochet.

 

Repeat row 1 until you reach the desired length.

 

You can use these beautiful textured crosses as an alternative to offset stitch, to create openwork with double crochet.

 

 

You can also try crocheting this stitch with wool to make a scarf or to incorporate openwork into your cold weather garments. We used fine yarn Petite Wool and a size 8 crochet hook.

 

It’s also perfect to make a summery openwork crocheted bag, if we use cotton.

 

As always, we encourage you to share your creations on Instagram, using the hashtag #weareknitters. We’d love to see all the ways you use these crossed stitches.